Date
20 November 2019

Mild to moderate allergic reactions

Most allergic reactions are mild to moderate. They are often a source of irritation and discomfort.

Causes of allergic reactions

Causes of allergic reactions

An allergic response can develop after touching, swallowing, tasting, eating, or breathing-in a particular allergen.

Symptoms of mild to moderate reactions

Symptoms of mild to moderate reactions

Most allergic reactions are mild to moderate and do not cause major problems, though they may be a source of irritation and discomfort.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction to dust mites, pollen, mould spores, or cat and dog dander can include:

  • hives (itchy red spots on the skin)
  • itching
  • nasal congestion
  • a rash
  • scratchy throat
  • watery or itchy eyes.

Source: ASCIA (opens in a new tab/window)

Recognise food allergy symptoms

Recognise food allergy symptoms

Symptoms may include:

  • swelling of lips, face, eyes
  • hives or welts
  • tingling mouth
  • abdominal pain
  • vomiting.

Recognise and respond to food allergies

Recognise and respond to food allergies

This short animation explains how to recognise and respond to the signs and symptoms of a mild-to-moderate food allergic reaction.

Steps for responding

Steps for responding

Most reactions occur quickly after ingestion or contact with an allergen.

  1. Stay with the young person.
  2. Follow the young person's Allergy or Anaphylaxis Action Plan, if they have one.
  3. Give any prescribed medication or treatment.
  4. Observe the young person closely for any change in condition, particularly their breathing for indications of a more serious reaction.
  5. Mild-to-moderate allergic reactions, which can be caused by foods, insect venom, or latex need to monitored in case the reaction progresses to severe (anaphylaxis).
  6. Seek medical help if concerned.
  7. Contact family, whānau, or carer.
  8. Identify the cause of the reaction and remove, if possible.
  9. If possible, share the cause of the reaction with whānau and health professionals.
  10. Allow the young person time to recover in a quiet area.
  11. Report and record the reaction on the school medical register.
  12. Review the incident to address potential safety issues.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Allergy and anaphylaxis guidelines for early childhood services and schools

Allergy and anaphylaxis guidelines for early childhood services and schools

Read time: 37 min

Publisher: Allergy New Zealand

Visit website

Website

What is allergy?

Publisher: Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

Visit website

File

How to be allergy aware: Information for school students

Read time: 2 min

Publisher: Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy

Download PDF

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Recognise and respond to allergic reactions”:

Return to the guide “Allergies and learning”

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