Date
25 August 2019

Review medication policies and procedures regarding access and storage

Ensure children are given proper care and that medication is stored and administered appropriately.

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ECE policies and procedures

ECE policies and procedures

Review your policies and procedures to align with the HS28 Medicine administration.

Your policy should include:

  • the name/s of who has authority to give medication
  • where medication will be safely stored and easily accessed by an adult when needed
  • a system for gaining written authority from parents
  • a system for recording medication stored and dosage to be given – name of child and the amount of medicine to be given
  • a review time for checking that stored medication has not expired.

Source: Ministry of Education (opens in a new tab/window)

School policies and procedures

School policies and procedures

Provide quick and safe access to allergy medications.

Your policy should include:

  • the name/s of who has authority to give medication
  • where medication will be safely stored and easily accessed by an adult when needed
  • a system for gaining written authority from parents
  • a system for recording medication stored and dosage to be given – name of student and the amount of medicine to be given
  • a review time for checking that stored medication has not expired.

Example of a school policy

Source: Ministry of Education (opens in a new tab/window)

Age appropriate access

Age appropriate access

Older students may prefer to carry their auto-injector EpiPen themselves with the  agreement of their parents and the school.

Support students to self-manage by:

  • ensuring someone else knows where their EpiPen is kept in the event of an emergency
  • working with students to store EpiPens in safe (for example, out of the sun) and easy to access locations
  • working with students to find out if they will carry their own medication to, from, and at school.

Adrenaline auto-injectors

Adrenaline auto-injectors

Adrenaline auto-injectors contain a single, fixed dose of adrenaline.

 

Adrenaline auto-injectors are designed for use by anyone, including people who are not medically trained.

In New Zealand, there are two doses of adrenaline auto-injectors available:

  • EpiPen®Jr (usually prescribed for children 10–20 kg.)  
  • EpiPen® (usually prescribed for adults and children over 20 kg.)

Source: ASCIA (opens in a new tab/window)

EpiPen management checklist

EpiPen management checklist

EpiPens contain life-saving medication (adrenaline).

  • Adrenaline auto-injectors, such as EpiPens, should be kept out of the reach of small children. However, they must be readily available and NOT kept in a locked cupboard.
  • An ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis should always be stored with an adrenaline auto-injector.
  • EpiPens contain a clear window near the tip where you can check to see if the adrenaline is discoloured or contains sediment. If this is the case, the device should be replaced as the adrenaline may be less effective.
  • Store adrenaline auto-injectors away from direct sources of heat and sunlight.
  • Establish a process for checking that the EpiPen has not expired.

Source: ASCIA (opens in a new tab/window)

Useful resources

Useful resources

File

Agreement to administer medication

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Download PDF

File

Medication placement at school: Anaphylaxis

Read time: 2 min

Publisher: Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia

Download PDF

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Develop and implement health and safety policies and procedures”:

Return to the guide “Allergies and learning”

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