Date
18 September 2019

Support positive behaviour using ​​recommended approaches

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Supporting communication, social interaction, thinking, and positive behaviour’

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Consider a range of supports

Consider a range of supports

As each student with ASD is different, some approaches will work better than others. Regularly reflect on what's working well and refine as needed.
  • Remove or minimise things that can cause distress.
  • Develop some cues individually with the student that will signal such things as when they need to move to a quiet space.
  • Create opportunities for students to take the lead using their strengths and interests.
  • Help students develop a strong sense of identity and be knowledgeable about their specific learning needs and abilities.
  • Regularly teach and reinforce classroom and playground rules.
  • Take every opportunity to give specific positive feedback about attempted tasks that meet achievement goals.
  • Consider short term contracts to achieve learning goals and task expectations. Negotiate these with the student.
  • Teach organisation and coping skills.
  • Teach self-management skills, including alternative ways to achieve goals, managing anger, problem-solving, asking for help, and finding a safe place or person.

Establish routines

Establish routines

Wherever possible, build predictability into your classroom.

Support routines and spoken instructions with visuals.

Recognise the onset of sensory overload

Recognise the onset of sensory overload

Always monitor the impact of the sensory landscape of your learning space. 

Ask for feedback from students.

Manage difficult times

Manage difficult times

Appropriate techniques acknowledge the student’s need, provide some boundaries, ensure they get support, and help them manage their actions.

  • Agree on a cool down zone.
  • Remove unnecessary demands or requests.
  • Keep on top of classroom noise and activity.
  • Know the beginning signs of anxiety for your student, for example, tapping, rocking, loud voice, fidgeting.
  • Agree an approach or signal for managing unexpected change.
  • Redirect the student to another activity they enjoy or distract them with a specific task or errand, seamlessly and naturally separating them.
  • Move closer or move away as appropriate, stand side on rather than face-on.
  • Give clear instructions that the student is more likely to follow.
  • Remind them of any self-management strategies they know.
  • Facilitate relaxation.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Social story creator & library

Publisher: TouchAutism

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Key areas to support”:

Return to the guide “ASD and learning”

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