Date
08 July 2020

Cooperative and collaborative approaches

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Enable access and participation in learning’

Use structured approaches

Use structured approaches

Using structured cooperative and collaborative approaches to support participation has multiple behaviour related-benefits for students.
  • Reduces anxiety prompted by being put-on-the-spot.
  • Reduces anxiety related to public speaking by providing a structure for participation.
  • Creates opportunities for all students to participate.
  • Supports more equitable participation and provides a structure for each person to have a voice.
  • Often provides students with language for collaboration, for example, sentence starters.
  • Provides opportunities to learn from and hear from peers.
  • Helps students listen for key information and supports the synthesis and sharing of information with a wider group.

Support cooperative learning

Support cooperative learning

Cooperative learning, ko te akoranga mahi tahi, reduces the competitiveness and perceptions of failure that may contribute to challenging behaviour.

Explore these group and team activities. Note all activities can be transferred to online contexts.

Character­istics of effective groups

Character­istics of effective groups

Successful cooperative learning groups.
  • Can be teacher-selected to ensure balance, inclusion, and productivity.
  • Can be formed around students who need specific support.
  • Are no larger than four students.
  • Give students specific roles, for example, using cooperative group role cards or group roles stickers.
  • Can be changed periodically. It can take students some time to build relationships. Think about changing groups to extend the relationships each student is building.

Tuakana-teina in a primary school

Tuakana-teina in a primary school

Using a tuakana-teina approach, the older or more expert tuakana helps and guides the younger or less expert teina.

Self-assessment

Self-assessment

Are these strategies emerging, partly in place, or established in your practice?

Illustrate your response with examples from your own teaching.

  • Teach and model social behaviours for group work.
  • Teach students how to assume different roles within a group.
  • Students know and can use strategies for managing disagreements in a group.
  • Use a variety of established cooperative group structures (for example, the Jigsaw, Two Stay and Two Stray).
  • Provide feedback about students’ ability to listen, check others’ understanding, and encourage others during group work.
  • Provide opportunities for students to assume leadership roles and responsibilities.
  • Provide specific guidance for when students are acting as mentors or peer tutors.
  • Use a variety of strategies to encourage student responses (for example, individual questioning, group discussions, and reciprocal peer tutoring).
  • Use wait time to allow students time to think and process.

Source: Teaching for positive behaviour: Self-assessment tool (opens in a new tab/window)

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Cooperative learning

Publisher: Goalbook

Visit website

Website

Think-pair-share and discussion templates

Publisher: Goalbook

Visit website

Website

Jigsaw

Publisher: WETA Public Broadcasting

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Enable access and participation in learning”:

Return to the guide “Behaviour and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Behaviour and learning

Strategies for action:

Top