Date
20 November 2019

Develop a plan of support

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Concussion: Support a return to learning and activity’

Overview

Overview

Every concussion impacts on learning and wellbeing.

A "return to learning" and a "return to activity" plan will be needed for each individual following a concussion.

Design with whānau.

Develop a return to learning plan

Develop a return to learning plan

A return to learning plan has 3 components.

1. Stepped progression

A typical Return to Learning Plan usually:

  • starts with a couple of days at home
  • progresses to partial days at school
  • works up to full days at school.

Be aware that anything that taxes the brain, including reading, texting, using computers or mobile devices, and listening to audio recordings or music, can negatively affect recovery.

2. Personal adjustments

Make adjustments like limiting homework, having a classmate take notes, or finding a darker, quieter spot for the child or young person to play, work, or rest. (See suggested accommodations in Academic adjustments following concussion)

3. Whole-class approaches

Identify adjustments that can be embedded in the usual centre or classroom routine, rather than singling out the child or young person. These will often be valuable for others as well.

Source: Adapted from Brain 101: The concussion playbook (opens in a new tab/window)

Reduce risk of second impact syndrome

Reduce risk of second impact syndrome

Set rigourous boundaries around safety.

Returning to activity too soon increases the risk of a second concussion, which can result in serious injury.

Reflection questions for key contact person

Reflection questions for key contact person

By facilitating a collaborative team approach to concussion management, a staff team can positively contribute to a child's recovery.

Consider how you will:

  • Develop the return-to-learning and return-to-activity plans with the child and their whānau.
  • Monitor and communicate progress towards recovery between home and school.
  • Provide a key contact for the child or young person and whānau when they need someone to talk to.
  • Make staff aware of how to provide assistance and ensure safety.
  • Coordinate scaling activity or workload up and down (sometimes children and young people will do fine for a while and then need to drop back a step).
  • Oversee the individualising of supports.
  • Coordinate the management of medication.
  • Watch for new or recurring symptoms.
  • Monitor the child or young person’s levels of anxiety and frustration.

Source: Brain 101: The concussion playbook – Key points (opens in a new tab/window)

Useful resources

Useful resources

Returning to activity from a concussionmild traumatic brain injury

Returning to activity from a concussion/mild traumatic brain injury

Read time: 1 min

Publisher: Starship Hospital and ACC

Download PDF

File

Concussion in schools: Know your role

Read time: 1 min

Publisher: Parachute Canada

Download PDF

Website

BCCFA – Returning to school after a concussion

Publisher: BC Centre for Ability

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Concussion: Support a return to learning and activity”:

Return to the guide “Supporting learners with acquired brain injury”

Guide to Index of the guide: Acquired brain injury and learning

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