Date
20 November 2019

Develop an effective literacy programme for years 1-8

Provide access to targeted programmes and recommended approaches underpinned by the latest research.

Teach phonological awareness

Teach phonological awareness

Use the recommended resources to guide teaching on phonological awareness and spelling.

The Sounds and Words online resource developed by the Ministry of Education provides support in four areas:

Source: Sounds and Words, Literacy Online (opens in a new tab/window)

Build literacy support into group work

Build literacy support into group work

Many students with dyslexia will benefit from targeted literacy support built into collaborative activities.

  • Offer interactive, paired or shared writing activities, where the writing is co-constructed by a small group of students and discussed orally before it is written.
  • Make headphone splitters, with 2 inputs available, to enable two students to listen and follow a print or digital story to build up their reading and letter-sound knowledge.
  • Foster tuakana-teina relationships, where a more expert tuakana (older child) helps and guides the less expert teina (younger child).

Teach a structured literacy programme

Teach a structured literacy programme

Ensure recommended approaches are part of your literacy programme for all students.
  • Teach spelling by building on a student’s strengths and what they know – start with known sound or spelling patterns and develop lists of words that fit into these patterns.
  • Develop word-recognition strategies by teaching students how many words can be analysed into the parts they are built from. Start with roots, affixes, chunks, syllables and rhymes and use word-part cards to explore possible combinations.
  • Teach awareness of phonemes (the small distinctive sounds in language) using blending and segmenting, and allow time to guide students.
  • Develop and display a list of high-frequency words that students with dyslexia can use for easy reference.
  • Provide extra time.

Take a multi-sensory approach

Take a multi-sensory approach

Multi-sensory approaches are often appreciated by students with dyslexia. It helps them stay focused and supports their attention.
  • Teach the names and sounds of letters by having students bring objects from home that begin with that letter sound. Place the objects in a box. Take them out one at a time and discuss them, focusing on the initial letter sound.
  • Use hoops to identify syllables with one hoop for each syllable. Have the students jump from one hoop to the next as they say each syllable aloud.
  • Encourage older students to explore rhyme using poems, pop songs and rap, with accompanying dance moves.
  • Introduce students to read-aloud options or text-to-speech functions that highlight and track the text when it is read aloud.
  • Use colour-coding to distinguish between roots, affixes, chunks and syllables.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Sounds and words

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Sound Sense Supporting reading and writing in years 1 3

Sound Sense: Supporting reading and writing in years 1-3

Read time: 35 min

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Download PDF (2 MB)

Website

English – school stories from Enabling e-Learning

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Support literacy development”:

Return to the guide “Dyslexia and learning”

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