Date
21 July 2019

Assessment and monitoring using a team approach

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Identify needs and how to provide support’

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Gather information

Gather information

Every child with FASD is unique. Their strengths and areas of need will be varied.

Gather information about your student from classroom observations. Include video observations so that they can be discussed with your support team.

Useful tools:

Work as a team

Work as a team

Build an effective partnership with the learning support coordinator, RTLB, parents, and specialists such as occupational therapists.

  • Work with your team to discuss strategies that will work for your student and provide you with support.
  • Discuss assessment approaches, evaluate assessment data together, and consider possible strategies.
  • Implement a strengths-based approach.
  • Ask about recommended resources and online communities.
  • Foster understanding of FASD to decrease secondary behaviours, such as mental health problems, frustration, and anxiety.
  • Share your concerns and ask questions.
  • Meet together with the student and whānau and take a team approach to planning and providing support.
  • Find out about staff members who have experience teaching students with FASD, or personal experience of FASD, who might be happy to advise you.

Collaborate with professionals

Collaborate with professionals

A large part of the FASD diagnostic process includes developing strategies and interventions specifically designed for the unique needs of the child, to help them learn successfully.

A report containing the assessment findings, medical diagnosis, and recommendations is available (with the consent of the legal guardian) to families, caregivers, and educators who work with the child. The assessment provides information about the child’s needs and allows interventions to be tailored to their strengths and challenges.

Because FASD is not routinely screened for in infancy and early childhood, many children with FASD remain undiagnosed when starting school. Most commonly diagnosis is made when the child is between 6–12 years old, and having learning or behaviour difficulties. Sometimes, the condition may never be diagnosed.

Use your SMS to share data

Use your SMS to share data

Secondary school students see several teachers each day.

Use your SMS to support up-to-date information sharing, including student's action plans and IEPs.

Utilise collaborative tools

Utilise collaborative tools

John Robinson reflects on the value of using the SMS to share information about students between staff and e-portfolios to share information with parents.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Narrative assessment: A guide for teachers

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Identify needs and how to provide support”:

Return to the guide “Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder and learning”

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