Date
14 October 2019

Support participation and build confidence

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Helpful classroom strategies years 1-8’

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Survey students about preferences

Survey students about preferences

Ask students what supports their learning and what gets in the way.

I personally do a survey at the beginning of every class, every semester ... to get an idea of who is in the classroom to begin with and what they would benefit, or what they want to see in the class, what would work [and not work] for them.

Nancy Searcy

Ideas to increase participation

Ideas to increase participation

Discuss with the student what will support their participation.

Build the suggestions into your teaching practice.

  • Create clear, planned pathways for moving around the classroom. Minimise random obstacles.
  • Familiarise the student with a new classroom layout BEFORE making changes.
  • Encourage all students to position themselves in optimum environments to support their engagement and attention.
  • Discuss with the student the best places for them to sit to access information at a distance.
  • Make support options, such as text-to-speech, available to all students. Model and encourage their use.
  • Welcome and encourage digital technologies selected by students, and design activities so that they can use them productively.
  • Create a culture where students support each other.
  • Use the student’s name when addressing them.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

Self advocacy traffic light system in a primary classroom

Publisher: BLENNZ: Blind and Low Vision Education Network NZ

Visit website

Website

Dance mat typing

Publisher: BBC

Visit website

Website

Story Kit

Publisher: ICDL Foundation

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Helpful classroom strategies years 1-8”:

Return to the guide “Low vision and learning”

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