Date
19 January 2020

Adopt mentoring models to ensure every student has someone who can provide support and monitor their well-being

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Develop curriculum and systems that respond to all students’ aspirations’

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Whānau tutor groups

Whānau tutor groups

To ensure every student is well known by somebody, Hillmorton High School has moved to smaller vertical mentoring groups.

River groups: A model

River groups: A model

At Hauraki Plains College, teachers and support staff play an active role in mentoring and supporting students in their learning, using the concept of river groups.

The following two videos outline teacher and student perspectives on the approach:

Read more about the background to the approach in Supporting future-oriented learning & teaching — a New Zealand perspective

Flex time: A model

Flex time: A model

Innovation in timetabling allows a high school to introduce flex time. Students make decisions about what they learn and who they learn from.

Provide professional learning

Provide professional learning

Lack of information is one of the greatest barriers to successful transition.

School staff with comprehensive, up-to-date knowledge of community support options can be valuable conduits of information for the student and their family/whānau.

Areas where staff could consider developing their knowledge of community-based support options include: supported living, employment, community participation, disability support, transport and further study options.

Ministry of Education

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Develop flexible systems to support all students”:

Return to the guide “Preparing students to leave school”

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