Date
16 August 2020

Plan to self-review

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Access research and recommendations for self-review’

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An inter­connected process

An inter­connected process

Many interrelated aspects need to be considered as each student prepares for leaving school. These are an integral part of the purpose of the curriculum.

Use best practice guidelines

Use best practice guidelines

Best practice principles that underpin successful transitions are supported by recent New Zealand research and international best evidence.

  • The transition from school process starts when the student turns 14. It aims to maximise academic achievement as well as functional life skills.
  • The student and their family/whānau drive the process.
  • Partnerships are developed between the school and community supports
  • The transition plan is embedded in mainstream education and community settings.
  • The process identifies and overcomes barriers to the student’s learning and support.
  • The student and family/whānau are offered information and support that opens the door to a wide range of inclusive community-based options.
  • There is a clear distinction between the needs of the family/whānau and the needs of the student during transition.
  • Functional life skills should be developed and practised at home and in other natural settings.
  • Outcomes of the transition planning process should be regularly evaluated.

Source: Adapted from the National Transition Guidelines (opens in a new tab/window)

ERO recommend­ations

ERO recommend­ations

Consider these recommendations as part of your robust self-review processes.

  • Determine the extent to which curriculum, careers, and pastoral care processes assist students to develop career management competencies and successful pathways from school.
  • Develop curriculum and systems to ensure a focus on identifying and responding to the aspirations, strengths, and needs of all students and their families or whānau.
  • Work increasingly with families, whānau, and iwi to develop student pathways to education, training, and employment.
  • Engage local businesses and community health, social, and education agencies to respond to students’ futures in education, training, and employment.
  • Identify and implement the innovation required to support the pathways and success of learners, including the development of courses for Māori and Pacific learners.

Source: Secondary schools: Pathways for future education, training and employment (July 2013) (opens in a new tab/window)

Ensure a student-driven process

Ensure a student-driven process

Review with students, whānau, and staff how your school supports students to plan and prepare for the future.

Ask the following questions:

  • Does the student and their whānau actively drive the process?
  • Is the student actively engaged in determining their current interests and future aspirations and how to pursue them?
  • Does the student and their whānau have access to information and opportunities to explore post-school options?
  • Does the student have repeated exposure to unfamiliar concepts and support to develop skills within the curriculum?
  • Is the student supported to identify pathways to meet practical, learning, and emotional needs?
  • Is the effectiveness of the transition support regularly evaluated with the student to identify and overcome barriers to the student’s transition preparations?

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

National Transition Guidelines

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Access research and recommend­ations”:

Return to the guide “Preparing students to leave school”

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