Date
20 November 2019

Explore beliefs, values, and expectations of parents and whānau

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Exploring Māori cultural perspectives on inclusion, learning support and disability’

On this page:

On this page:

Current page section: Explore beliefs, values, and expectations

Go to top of current page: Explore beliefs, values, and expectations

Show list of page sections

Whānau perspectives on disability

Whānau perspectives on disability

Parents and whānau will have differing perspectives on inclusion, disability and accessing learning support for their children.

There is no one approach to partnering with them.

Find out about their:

  • values and beliefs about disability and inclusion (including knowledge of their whakapapa [genealogy]) 
  • personal experiences of learning
  • hopes and dreams for their child
  • fears and anxieties
  • expectations around support for learning.

Where parent and whānau values and expectations differ from those of your school, be open to learning from parents. 

Whānau expectations of schools

Whānau expectations of schools

Māori parents expect schools to:

  • give them honest, accurate, and useful information about their child’s progress and achievement
  • support their children to become confident learners who accepted challenges and maintained their personal mana
  • invite them to be part of their child’s learning
  • acknowledge their culture and values through the use of Māori protocols, for example, mihi and karakia at meetings
  • provide programmes in te reo Māori and tikanga that supported their children’s learning.

Source: Partners in learning: Parents' voices (September 2008) (opens in a new tab/window)

Is my child welcome?

Is my child welcome?

Parents of children with special education needs found that some schools were not open to working with them, and they felt that they were unwelcome. They struggled with entrenched attitudes by some school staff about their child and his or her learning or behavioural needs. For some parents, labelling their child and themselves, sometimes linked to previous family history with the school, undermined the development of constructive relationships.

Make culture visible

Make culture visible

Janelle Riki-Waaka, talks about how schools can better reflect the bicultural heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand so that all students can connect to and see themselves in their school.

Seek student voice

Seek student voice

Māori rangatahi who identify as Deaf help schools to have a better understanding of their access and communication needs, and their aspirations.

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Explore Māori perspectives on inclusion”:

Return to the guide “Supporting Māori students”

Top