Date
18 September 2019

Articulate your schools commitment to inclusive practice

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Understanding what inclusive education means’

Respond to concerns

Respond to concerns

Some parents may fear that including students with disabilities will negatively affect their children’s learning. Mediate these issues by addressing misconceptions.

Talk about the benefits of diversity

Talk about the benefits of diversity

"If you want your son or daughter to be more empathetic, to be a full human, she or he needs to be exposed to difference."

Mark Spooner 

 

Mediate parental concerns

Mediate parental concerns

Identify questions from the community that staff may need support to negotiate.

Develop a shared understanding of your school’s inclusive practice.

Responding to parent concerns2

Source: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga (opens in a new tab/window)

Support your staff

Support your staff

The board of trustees is responsible for ensuring the school has the capacity and capability to meet the needs of all students who are entitled to enrol at the school by:

  • making sure every board member understands the board’s legal and ethical obligations to provide a high-quality education for all students who choose to enrol at the school
  • developing realistic goals and strategies for the school through the school charter and the school’s strategic and annual plans
  • monitoring the performance of the principal to ensure that they are meeting the school’s legal obligations and the board’s goals
  • communicating with parents and the local community to ensure that their experience of the school is positive and that their needs are being met
  • budgeting for adequate resources to enable the principal to effectively meet the goals and objectives the board has set
  • supporting the principal to seek help and advice from the community, other professionals, the Ministry, or other stakeholders as required to ensure that every student enrolled at the school experiences an education that meets their individual needs.

Understand the principal's role

Understand the principal's role

The principal is responsible for building teachers’ skills, expertise, and confidence by:

  • giving teachers release time to connect with others and build their knowledge
  • connecting teachers with in-school supports, including other teachers who know the student well or have experience of working with a student with similar needs
  • connecting teachers with outside agencies and experienced external colleagues and encouraging them to work in partnership with these people
  • connecting teachers with parents – they are the experts on their child
  • forming clusters with other schools to facilitate staff training and development
  • supporting collective responsibility for all students in your school
  • supporting teachers to share classroom practices, learn from each other, and problem-solve together.

Useful resources

Useful resources

FAQs on schooling for disabled children and young people

FAQs on schooling for disabled children and young people

Read time: 21 min

Publisher: Inclusive Education Action Group

Download PDF

Website

Education for All

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

Learning better together research DVD

Publisher: IHC New Zealand

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Understand inclusive education”:

Return to the guide “The role of the board of trustees”

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