Date
18 July 2019

Partner with whānau and welcome their diverse perspectives

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Leading with moral purpose’

What partnership looks like

What partnership looks like

We are true partners when:
  • you listen to what I have to say
  • you acknowledge my intelligence
  • you want to learn more about my ways
  • you don’t judge me
  • you engage me in genuine dialogue
  • we make decisions together
  • you show that my child matters to you
  • you include my experience, knowledge and viewpoints with yours.

Source: The home-school partnership programme, 2003, cited in ERO’s Partners in Learning report – Findings from parents of students with special education needs (opens in a new tab/window)

Parent perspective on effective partnership

Parent perspective on effective partnership

Garth Clarricoats reflects on what makes a successful home-school partnership.

Learn about diversity together

Learn about diversity together

Create opportunities to discuss and build shared understandings about diversity and valuing all learners.
  • Be open to learning from and with parents, whānau and your local community.
  • Create multiple opportunities for your community to ask questions about inclusion and what it would mean for their own child.
  • Invite your community to see activities that explicitly model inclusion at your school, or at another school.
  • Offer presentations or workshops to parents and whānau about the value of including all learners.
  • Create opportunities for students and their whānau to share what valuing diversity means to them.
  • Be ready to articulate your vision for inclusion language your community can relate to.

Consider barriers to partnership

Consider barriers to partnership

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to working in partnership.

Discuss with whānau ways of working together that respect diversity, are culturally responsive, and are inclusive of individual needs.

Questions to ask parents and whānau

Questions to ask parents and whānau

Parents and whānau will have diverse perspectives on inclusion, diversity, disability and accessing support.

Ask parents and whānau about:

  • their values and beliefs about disability and inclusion
  • their experiences of learning
  • their hopes and dreams for their child and their community
  • their fears and anxieties
  • their feelings about children of all abilities learning together
  • their expectations around resourcing – for example, how teacher’s aides are used, how much time their child is included in activities with their peers.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Website

What is important to your community

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

Engaging parents, whānau, and community

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Website

Welcoming parents

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Leading with moral purpose”:

Return to the guide “Leading schools that include all learners ”

Top