Date
20 November 2019

Understand the beliefs, values, and expectations of parents and whānau

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Modelling a commitment to inclusion’

What true partnership looks like

What true partnership looks like

We are true partners when:

  • you listen to what I have to say
  • you acknowledge my intelligence
  • you want to learn more about my ways
  • you don’t judge me
  • you engage me in genuine dialogue
  • we make decisions together
  • you show that my child matters to you
  • you include my experience, knowledge, and viewpoints with yours.

Source: Partners in learning: Parents’ voices 2008 (opens in a new tab/window)

Expect different perspectives

Expect different perspectives

Parents and whānau will have different perspectives on diversity and inclusion, and different expectations of partnership.

Seek to understand:

  • their values and beliefs about disability and inclusion
  • their own experiences of learning
  • their hopes and dreams for their child
  • their fears and anxieties
  • their expectations around how their child will be supported in the classroom and in the playground.

Where parent and whānau values and expectations differ from those of your school, be open to learning from them.

Address common parental concerns

Address common parental concerns

Parents of children with special education needs found that some schools were not open to working with them, and they felt that they were unwelcome. They struggled with entrenched attitudes by some school staff about their child and his or her learning or behavioural needs. For some parents, labelling their child and themselves, sometimes linked to previous family history with the school, undermined the development of constructive relationships.

Involve families in transitions

Involve families in transitions

Find out what approaches and strategies have worked well for their children in their previous school.

Value parental perspectives

Value parental perspectives

Parent and advocate Leah Petersen describes some of things she would expect to see in an inclusive school.

Useful resources

Useful resources

Includes guiding questions, tools, and resources.
Website

What is important to your community

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Visit website

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Model a commitment to inclusion”:

Return to the guide “​Partnering with parents, whānau, and communities ”

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