Date
25 September 2021
11439 [Maori-students.jpg]

Supporting ākonga Māori
- Updated
- Popular

Culturally responsive strategies to meet the needs of ākonga Māori who require additional support.

Strengthening and affirming the self-identity and self-esteem of ākonga Māori who may need additional support to learn is a central theme.

How to use this guide

Make connections with the guiding principles of Ka Hikitia.

Disruption alone is not enough - we need to dismantle what is not working, learn new theories, discourses & practices to reform our [learning communities] so that they are places where both treaty partners can enjoy the benefits that success in education can incur.

Summary of important concepts:

Strategies for action

Five key strategies to support the inclusive design of learning environments for ākonga Māori.

Developing cultural capability

Critical consciousness offers a way of addressing inequities in our education system. It means recognising unconscious bias, reflecting critically on the imbalance of power and resources in society and taking anti-oppressive action to do something about it for the better. It means recognising white privilege, understanding racism, inequity faced by Māori and disrupting that status quo to strengthen equity – Te Hurihanganui.

Video hosted on Youtube http://youtu.be/5cTvi5qxqp4

Dr Ann Milne; Colouring in the white spaces: Reclaiming cultural identity in whitestream schools.

Four suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Upholding rights

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Promoting kaupapa Māori

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Developing critical consciousness

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Leading inclusive practice

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Explore Māori perspectives on inclusion

Develop an understanding of the different perspectives and values held by Māori parents and whānau. 

Mā te kōrero, ka mōhio.

Mā te mōhio, ka mārama.

Mā te mārama, ka mātau.

Through discussion we become aware.

Through awareness we gain understanding.

Through understanding we gain proficiency/expertise.

Whakataukī

Two suggestions for implementing this strategy:

Know your Māori learners

Demonstrate care by getting to know your ākonga Māori and what's important to them. Make connections to their experiences and contexts to support learning and strengthen relationships.

Video hosted on Vimeo http://vimeo.com/113877186

The most profound way to create a culturally responsive context is through introducing co-construction, where ākonga Māori are free to bring their own experiences into that classroom context.

Three suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Build relationships

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Share mihi

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Ask the student what will help

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Establish reciprocal relationships

Develop positive relationships with the community of people who know the student well.

Video hosted on Youtube http://youtu.be/UrREJhOkFjw

Manaakitanga, or caring for your students’ wellbeing and learning, provides a common purpose and bond with parents and whānau.

Four suggestions for implementing this strategy:

Build community networks

Welcome your community into the classroom and take your class out to the community.

Video hosted on Vimeo http://vimeo.com/113877058

It’s not enough to invite the community to come to you – you have to go into the community.

Two suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Value whānau and community expertise

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. ​​​Foster whānau engagement

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Co-design a culturally sustaining environment

Ākonga Māori are more likely to achieve when they see themselves and their culture reflected positively in subject matter and learning contexts.

Video hosted on Vimeo http://vimeo.com/100662337

A high school English teacher describes how she matches her teaching strategies and learning resources to the students’ interests, experiences, and needs.

Four suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Integrate te reo Māori and tikanga Māori

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Make cultural links

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Provide leadership opportunities

    Includes:

    • Video
  4. Use technologies

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Key resources

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Tātaiako: Cultural competencies for teachers of ākonga Māori

Read time: 29 min

Tātaiako is a starting point for schools and early childhood education (ECE) services developing cultural competence.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Working with Maori students with special education needs He mahi whakahirahira

Working with ākonga Māori with special education needs, He mahi whakahirahira

Explores the key components of culturally responsive, evidence-based, special education practice and describes holistic and inclusive responses to educating all tamariki, especially those with identified special education need.

Publisher: The New Zealand Council for Educational Research

Price: One off charge $44.95

File

Ka Hikitia: Actions for schools – Te Whānau: Education provision responds to learners within the context of their whānau

Resource to support the implementation and embedding of Ka Hikitia. It includes specific actions and readings to get you started.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

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