Date
09 December 2019
11457 [Inclusive-classroom-culture.jpg]

Developing an inclusive classroom culture
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An inclusive classroom culture values and recognises the contributions of all students, their families/whānau, and communities. 

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Strategies for action

Four key strategies for developing an inclusive classroom

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Value what each student brings

Many aspects of students' lives remain hidden unless we offer multiple opportunities to share stories and experiences and connect these to learning.

Video hosted on Vimeo http://vimeo.com/100662411

John Robinson, HoD Learning Support at Onslow College, reflects on how inclusive practice is developing across the school.

Four suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Understand identity, culture, and language

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. ​Develop learner profiles

    Includes:

    • Resources
  3. Know your learner

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  4. Include students' languages and cultures

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Establish a respectful class climate

Learn about every child. Allow that knowledge to underpin respect and understanding. 

Four suggestions for implementing this strategy:

  1. Learn about diversity and equity together

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  2. Have high expectations

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources
  3. Support student leadership

    Includes:

    • Video
  4. Strengthen a supportive peer culture

    Includes:

    • Video
    • Resources

Plan for everyone to participate and achieve

Create environments for students, where barriers are minmised and learning supports and flexibility are built in to the environment at the outset.

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“Children have the right to be consulted,  to freedom of speech and opinion, and to participate in and challenge decisions made on their behalf .” (Smith, 1997).

Jude McAthur - Learning better together: Working towards inclusive education in New Zealand schools (p 14) 

Three suggestions for implementing this strategy:

Take a community approach

Bring your community into the classroom and take your classroom out to the community.

Indicators for building community:

  • Everyone is made to feel welcome.
  • Students help each other.
  • Staff collaborate with each other.
  • Staff and students treat one another with respect.
  • There is a partnership between staff and parents/carers.
  • Staff and governors work well together.
  • All local communities are involved in the school.

Three suggestions for implementing this strategy:

Key resources

Website

Quality teaching for diverse students in schooling: Best evidence synthesis iteration (BES)

Read time: 288 min

This BES is intended to contribute to the development of an evidence-base for policy and practice in schooling. It covers quality teaching, pedagogical practices and creating effective links between schools and other cultural contexts in which students are socialised, to facilitate learning.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

Partners in learning Good practice

Partners in learning: Good practice

Read time: 50 min

This report discusses the factors that contribute to the success of “engagement”, defined as a meaningful, respectful partnership between schools and their parents, whānau, and communities.

Publisher: Education Review Office | Te Tari Arotake Matauranga

Website

Working as a community

The relationships between whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, kotahitanga, and rangatiratanga school culture to build school and community culture are explained. Networks of support that can be accessed are identified on this page.

Publisher: Ministry of Education | Te Tāhuhu o te Mātauranga

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