Date
16 August 2020

Understand emotions and build confidence

Suggestion for implementing the strategy ‘Helpful classroom strategies in years 9–13’

Demonstrate empathy and understanding

Demonstrate empathy and understanding

A teacher’s empathy can have a significant impact on a student’s confidence.

Build trust by finding out all you can about dyslexia.

Recognise student effort

Recognise student effort

Students with dyslexia can become very tired from having to concentrate and process information. Use visuals to recognise small steps towards achieving larger goals. Provide specific positive feedback frequently.

Foster confidence and trust

Foster confidence and trust

Make sure practical supports and actions are built into the culture of the classroom.

Minimise homework

Minimise homework

When I am at school, I use an enormous amount of my energy to keep myself safe and focused.

At the end of school I am extremely tired and do not cope well with homework.

Can you please think about ways to minimise homework for me and make it manageable?

Student

Closely monitor wellbeing

Closely monitor wellbeing

Be alert for signs that a student is not feeling good about themselves.

Act when you notice something.

As students move through school, pressures increase. Frustrations, anxiety, and stress can cause a lack of motivation and give students a poor view of themselves as a learner.

The dyslexia-stress-anxiety connection includes a step-by-step guide for supporting students to de-stress.

Recognise student strengths

Recognise student strengths

It can be empowering and motivating for your students to know they are able to learn.

Help them to recognise their areas of strength and need so they can take control of their own learning.

Use these approaches to build rapport:

  • Demonstrate a positive belief in your learner’s ability.
  • Make sure your learners experience success to strengthen their self-image.
  • Show you care, have empathy, and make them feel included. It’s important your learner feels that you know what it’s like to have dyslexia.
  • Recognise effort and give constructive feedback: provide tangible evidence of progress.
  • Don’t lower your expectations. Set realistic targets.
  • Give students a sense of control, for example, provide options so they can choose how they prefer to present different pieces of work.

Source: National Centre of Literacy and Numeracy for Adults (opens in a new tab/window)

Next steps

Return to the guide “Dyslexia and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Dyslexia and learning

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