Date
24 September 2020

Present information in different ways

Take a multi-sensory approach. When learners with dyslexia use all of their senses, they are better able to store and retrieve new information.

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Offer a range of options

Offer a range of options

Increase the range of ways students can engage with information. Use two or more learning pathways whenever possible.

When you provide students with written material, talk it through and ensure they understand it. Provide a digital format so they can use a screen reader if necessary.

Use multi-sensory approaches

Use multi-sensory approaches

Multi-sensory approaches are essential for students with dyslexia and valuable for all students.

Ask students what will help them

Ask students what will help them

Often the way material and information is presented can create barriers for students.

  • What font size, colour, and style works best for you?
  • What background colour do you prefer for paper handouts or slides?
  • How much white space on a page or slide helps you focus?
  • Does an image help your understanding of the task or information?
  • What other things will support your access, understanding, and attention?

Hands-on learning

Hands-on learning

Provide a range of opportunities for students to move and physically engage in learning.

Multi-sensory approaches activate different pathways in the brain and make the abstract more concrete.

Use digital technologies

Use digital technologies

Online tools provide additional practice and enable students to work at their own pace.

To supplement explicit instruction, select computer-based learning programs that enable repetition, are visual, provide immediate feedback, and are hands-on.

Provide all students with access to tools that:

  • support collaboration and timely feedback, such as Google docs
  • can be customised to meet their individual needs and preferences
  • provide for repetition and allow students to revisit them as often as necessary.

Next steps

More suggestions for implementing the strategy “Helpful classroom strategies in years 1–8”:

Return to the guide “Dyslexia and learning”

Guide to Index of the guide: Dyslexia and learning

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